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Installing a keyway

Installing a keyway on a shaft.
Small milling machine
This is very easily accomplished with a milling machine as they come in various shapes and sizes, but if you don't have one it is possible to drill a line of shallow holes along the shaft and then remove the excess with a file a little narrower than the proposed keyway.

An alternative would be to use a milling tool in your drill, although the shaft would need to be secure and very light milling would be the order of the day. This can be a bit awkward if you have a blind keyway, but there is a simpler method... See below.

Installing a keyway inside a disk or gear wheel.

For this you turn a stub of the same metal as the disk or gear wheel, down to a tight fit inside the disk or gear wheel and fit it inside and skim the surplus off so the front face is flush.

Next, simply centre punch the joined line where you want the keyway to be and drill through the disk or gear wheel to a slightly smaller size than is required, before splitting the two parts. As the material is the same, your drill should not wonder off line. All that is required now is to file it square to the right dimensions which is relatively easy as the bulk of the metal is removed with drilling.

The above keyways are being produced for a square piece of key steel to be installed.

By far a simpler way is to use a Scotch key. This involves having the end of the shaft flush with your disk or gearwheel as above, and simply drill between the two, half and half, and drive in a steel pin of the same diameter.

Alternatively, for easier dismantling purposes, the hole could be drilled slightly smaller and tapped before splitting, that way a single grub screw will lock them together soundly.



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